LOS ANGELES, CA — After weeks of mild temperatures, a scorcher of a heatwave will bring triple-digit temperatures to parts of Los Angeles over the next week.



a close up of a book: The National Weather Service issued an excessive heat watch ​Friday to go into effect from Tuesday morning through Friday night from the beaches across the valleys and to mountains.


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The National Weather Service issued an excessive heat watch ​Friday to go into effect from Tuesday morning through Friday night from the beaches across the valleys and to mountains.

The National Weather Service issued an excessive heat watch Friday to go into effect from Tuesday morning through Friday night from the beaches across the valleys and to mountains. Downtown Los Angeles could hit the upper 90s. The intense heatwave raises the specter of heat-related illnesses, strain on the power grid and the possibility of brush fires that could quickly spread in the hot and dry conditions.

According to the National Weather Service, the mountain and valley areas will face “dangerously hot conditions,” with temperatures possibly reaching 109 degrees.

The heatwave is expected to peak on Wednesday when:

  • Calabasas is expected to reach 107 degrees
  • Northridge is expected to reach 108
  • Malibu is expected to reach 88
  • Beverly Hills is expected to reach 97
  • Agoura Hills is expected to reach 101
  • Downtown Los Angeles is expected to reach 99
  • Pasadena is expected to reach 102
  • Long Beach is expected to reach 88

The watch will be in effect for the coastal region, stretching from the beaches into downtown Los Angeles, from Tuesday morning through Wednesday evening, with highs potentially reaching 98 degrees.

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“Tuesday through Thursday should be the hottest, when highs between 100 and 110 and minimum humidities between 5 and 15 percent will be common over most mountains and lower mountains,” according to the NWS. “Monday night through Tuesday night is of particular concern, when north winds increase and enhance the warming and drying over the coasts and nearby valleys.”

For interior valleys, “hot, dry and breezy conditions” could create critical fire-danger conditions.

“There is still some uncertainty as to when the heat will relax, but there is a potential for little change through next weekend, especially for interior areas,” according the weather service.

Coastal areas will see relief a little earlier, with onshore flow expected to return by late Wednesday, bringing a return of the marine layer that will bring temperatures down.

The California Independent System Operator, which manages the state’s power grid, released a statement Friday saying the agency “could take a number of actions to reduce demand and access additional energy” between Tuesday and Friday. The agency declared a “restricted maintenance operation” condition that will be in effect from noon to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Friday due to the forecasted high temperatures and demand. The declaration warns that all available resources will be needed to maintain supply, and calls on suppliers to defer scheduled maintenance on generators and transmission lines if possible.

“It is still too early to know the precise impact that next week’s high temperatures will have on the electricity grid,” according to Cal-ISO. “But the ISO is closely monitoring conditions and the anticipated increase in demand for electricity and will issue additional public notifications as warranted.”

If necessary, the ISO could issue a Flex Alert, which is a voluntary call for residents to conserve power during peak hours to reduce strain on the grid.

The NWS warned that extreme heat will “significantly increase the potential for heat-related illnesses.”

“Be prepared to drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun and check up on relatives and neighbors,” according to the NWS. “Young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles under any circumstances. This is especially true during warm or hot weather when car interiors can reach lethal temperatures in a matter of minutes.”

City News Service contributed to this report.

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