El Matador Surf Report

El Matador Surf Report

If you are going to surf El Matador (Malibu), you need a good reliable El Matador surf report.  There are a number of California surf reports, both free and paid. Ironically, the best El Matador surf reports are FREE. Windy.com publishes the newest and most easily understood graphics. Click on the text link under the embed map. If you are just beginning, scroll to the bottom of the page for a link that will take you to our understanding surfing reports page.

Having advanced information at your fingertips can play a big role in the planning of surf opportunities and allows the modern surfer to manage their time efficiently. With surfing conditions in constant change from one day to the next, the insights provided through surf forecasting proves invaluable to the surfer whose days in the water are limited. Time is money… and time is perhaps what you need to have a positive surfing experience. Study so you don’t waste your time. As any surfer will tell you…

New surfers should only concentrate on the three main areas which will provide you with the most valuable and important snippets of information. These bits of information only become valuable to you when you can relate what you see on the screen to what you see on the beach.  Later you can get the more detailed surf reports. El Matador Surf Report from Windy.com


El Matador Beach is one of three beaches within Robert H. Meyer Memorial State Beach. El Matador is the most popular of the three and the closest to Malibu. The parking lots for each beach are well-signed along Pacific Coast Highway in western Malibu. El Matador has a parking lot on the bluff with picnic tables that look out over the Pacific Ocean. A trail descends through unique eroding formations on the face of the bluff then stairs take you the rest of the way to the beach.

Beautiful sea stacks are on the beach and in the surf. This is a popular spot for pro photographers to shoot swimsuit models and stunning sunsets.

Explore north on the beach to caves and arches in the rocks. The largest cave faces the ocean at the bottom of a huge flat rock that is connected to the base of the bluff. It’s best to visit these natural features at low tide. Continuing your walk north leads to La Piedra State Beach. If you walk south you will pass in front of stunning homes on your way to Lechuza Beach.